Hao Laing, Dissection Series, Ink and Color on Silk, 2009-2010

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Tang Dixin, Reed, Video, Color, Sound, 10’17”, 2019

As much as Tang Dixin’s video may give the impression of a documentary film, once the work begins to reel, one quickly realizes the necessity for adopting a fictional perspective. A young Chinese Tang, who met a young Japanese Nan and convinced him to be buried in a hole among the reeds. This process seemed like two lonely strangers coincidentally met and played a game together, a unique encounter that could not have be repeated. Tang Dixin has an acute ability to grasp theatricality in a contemporary sense–the unusual, illogical and arbitrary encounters of strangers in an unfamiliar environment. The tacit understanding the two men have achieved is final, which neither has a past or a future, nor influenced by any conditions, but in the scenes constructed by these moving images here and now.

Yang Fudong, Endless Peaks -It’s the Ice, 2021,5-channel colour, black&white, silent video, Photography, acrylic and drawing on wood panel, Stainless steel mirror

It’s the Ice is the special extension of “Endless Peaks”, which is consisted of three different parts. Including the 5-channel colour, b&w and silent video present monk’s daily life, working and resting on the Mt. Tiantai. The triptych work, Endless Peaks – It’s the Wind, is made of photography, acrylic and drawing on wood panel. Along with the “icy floor” which is installed with the stainless steel mirror that completes the overall concept.

Ma Qiusha, From No.4 Pingyuanli to No.4 Tianqiaobeili, single channel video, 7’54”, 2007

Ma Qiusha’s From No.4 Pingyuanli to No.4 Tianqiaobeili and Tao Hui’s The Dusk of Teheran are both performances captured by a single camera lens, and both of which have strung together the stories of a lifetime through a single-channel video. Among the younger generation of contemporary Chinese artists, video art has become the mainstream, but those who have adopted this medium to manifest their personal perspectives are still few. “Art for the sake of life” is another classic expression for this kind of personal expression, not only is it part of the modern Chinese art, but also a core component in ancient art and literature, that the concerns of life of an individual as an “analogy” for society and history, this is how new artistic medium or genre grow their roots in existing Chinese experiences.

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